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#3 - Henry Mintzberg's Managerial Roles | Business 101: Principles of Management
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management Download free notes : https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 Henry Mintzberg's Managerial Roles There are many roles a manager has within an organization. Henry Mintzberg described ten specific managerial roles most commonly seen within organizations. Mintzberg classified the roles into three categories: interpersonal roles, or those roles associated with human interaction; informational roles, or those roles associated with sharing information and decisional roles, or those roles involved in decision-making. Interpersonal roles include the figurehead, leader and liaison. Informational roles include the monitor, disseminator and spokesperson. Decisional roles include the entrepreneur, disturbance-handler, resource-allocator and negotiator.
Views: 18199 Forever Suspicious
#12 - Frank and Lillian Gilbreth's Motion Study | Business 101
 
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Business 101 - Principles of Management #12 Frank and Lillian Gilbreth's Motion Study Free Notes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 Frank and Lillian Gilbreth were a husband-and-wife team whose contributions helped lay the foundational principles of scientific management. As associates of Frederick Taylor in the early 1900s, they were able to explore how time and motion studies could be used to identify the best possible way for a worker to complete a particular task. The results of such studies allowed for improvements to be made in employee satisfaction, efficiency, and productivity. The Gilbreths are best known for their work on these motion studies, which started with Frank's initial observations during his apprenticeship as a bricklayer. Frank focused on identifying the basic movements needed to lay brick effectively and isolated them to eliminate unnecessary movements. Frank presented his findings to his fellow bricklayers and found that those who used the movements he recommended were able to increase their output from 1,000 to 2,700 bricks per day. Taking this knowledge along with the experience he gained while working alongside Taylor, the Gillbreths began a career in scientific management consulting. They continued to refine their methods and later used a motion-picture camera and split-second clock to capture specific motions that they considered being the best possible way to perform a given task -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Presented By: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights by: Study.com
Views: 3090 Forever Suspicious
#38 – How division of labour is applied in an Organization? | Work Specialization in Organizations
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #38 – How division of labour is applied in an Organization? | Work Specialization in Organizations Work specialization, sometimes called a division of labour, refers to the degree to which an organization divides individual tasks into separate jobs. It allows the manager to take complex tasks and break them down into smaller, more precise tasks that individual workers can complete. An assembly line provides a good example for how work specialization is carried out in an organization. The advantages of work specialization include: - Employees can be an expert to some degree in their specific task - Higher levels of productivity - Lower quality control costs - Job security for employees due to specialized skills - Higher profit potential The disadvantages of work specialization include: - Limiting the ability to multi-task - Isolating and limiting employees - Smaller employee skill sets that can exist only when the employee is working - Limited cooperation and communication among employees ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Work specialization, disadvantages of work specialization, advantages of work specialization, division of labour, organizational structure, increase organisational productivity,
Views: 1293 Forever Suspicious
#1 - Management in Organizations | Business 101: Principles of Management
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management Lesson 1: Management in Organizations: Top, Middle & Low-Level Managers. Download Free Notes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 Summary: Management is the use of people and resources to accomplish organizational objectives. Managers can come in many forms and serve a variety of functions. The roles and responsibilities of what a manager does can differ from organization to organization, but they are typically categorized into three levels: top-level management, middle-level management, and lower-level management. Top-level management are your executives such as a CEO, CFO, President and Vice President. These top managers are responsible for setting the overall direction of a company and making sure that major organizational objectives are achieved. Middle-level managers are the head of major departments and their specialized units; they hold titles such as director, assistant director, regional director, division manger, dean, branch manager, and site manager. They spend most of their time developing and implementing strategic action plans needed to achieve the organizational goals set by top management. Low-level managers work most closely with the greater workforce to ensure that individual employees are meeting their performance goals in a way that aligns with the organizational goals. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Copyrights: Sherri Hartzell Presented by Soumy Nayak/ Forever Suspicious Channel
Views: 3257 Forever Suspicious
#5 - Classical Management Theory (1900-1930) | Business 101 - Principles of Management
 
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Business 101 - Principles of Management Classical Management Theory (1900-1930) Download Free notes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 Classical management theory was introduced in the late 19th century during the Industrial Revolution. At the time, managers were interested in findings ways to improve productivity, lower cost, increase the quality of their products, improve employee/manager relationships and increase efficiency at their factories. The main concern for classical management theorists is Ònding the best possible way for workers to perform and manage their tasks. Classical management theory is comprised of three separate branches - bureaucratic management, classical scientific management and classical administrative management - each unique in its approach towards finding the best possible way. Many of today's organizations continue to rely on the classical management approach. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by Soumy Nayak | Forever suspicious Copyrights by Study.com
Views: 4780 Forever Suspicious
#8 - Frederick Taylor & Management: Maximizing Productivity & Efficiency
 
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Business 101 - Principles of Management #8 Frederick Taylor & Management: Maximizing Productivity & Efficiency Free Notes : https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 Frederick Taylor began to recognize the shortcomings of systematic management practices early in his career as an engineer. He found that workers were underdeveloped, underpaid, and under-resourced, and consequently, they did not care to put forth a high level of productivity. As a result, factories were su×ering. Taylor's solution was to create a second approach to management known as scientific management. Taylor studied tasks and incentives to develop fixed procedures to maximize productivity and efficiency. After many experiments, Taylor developed a set of management principles that included: 1. Management should get rid of general guidelines for how to complete a task; instead, they should be replaced with a precise, scientific approach for each task of a worker's job. 2. Management should use those same principles of scientiÒc methodology to carefully recruit, select, train, and develop each worker according to the job they will hold for the company. 3. There should be a level of cooperation between sta× and management to be sure that jobs match plans and the principle of the developed methods. 4. Managers should provide the appropriate division of labour and responsibility between managers and workers; that is, the managers were responsible for planning the work and the employees were responsible for following that plan as they completed the work. Taylor quickly became known as the father of scientific management for having revolutionized management practices, most of which are still being used today. --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Forever Suspicious | Soumy Nayak Copyrights by: Study.com
Views: 2786 Forever Suspicious
#17 - Behavioural Management Theory: Understanding Employee Behavior & Motivation
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #17 - Behavioural Management Theory: Understanding Employee Behaviour & Motivation Behavioural management theory shifted management's belief that workers were like machines and productivity was the result of management's drive for profits alone. Theorists like Elton Mayo and others began studying the motives and behaviours of employees to find out what motivates employees to work harder. Observing a control group as they worked and manipulating variables like break times revealed that when workers feel a sense of autonomy over their work, their productivity increases. This shocking revelation instigated the need to re-think the leader-worker relationship. This gave way to the notion that workers are intrinsically motivated to work. When work is self-fulfilling and brings a high degree of satisfaction, productivity is high. Managers shifted focus from mere production and began building strong relationships with workers. To do this, managers provided employees with positive feedback and appraisals, good working conditions, involvement in decision-making, and good communication. Ultimately, managers who show concern for workers have high productivity because workers experience increased satisfaction. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com -----------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1581 Forever Suspicious
#9 - Gantt Charts & Bar Graphs - Henry Gantt's Contributions to Management | Business 101
 
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Business 101 - Principles of Management #9 Gantt Charts & Bar Graphs | Henry Gantt's Contributions to Management Free notes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 Henry Gantt worked alongside Fredrick Taylor for several years and is best known for his development of the Gantt chart. His main focus was on applying scientific analysis to all facets of work being done as a means of increasing productivity. His two major contributions were the Gantt chart and the task and bonus system. The Gantt chart is still a widely used today in project management and demonstrates a project schedule, showing terminal and summary elements from start to finish and the amount of time it takes to complete each task. Terminal elements are the smaller more intricate tasks that need to be completed as part of a larger task. A summary element is made up of terminal elements to form the larger task. The information that is depicted on the Gantt chart allows others to understand the individual work tasks and their due dates within the greater project deadline. The task and bonus system was an incentive program aimed at increasing an employee's productivity, whereby an employee would receive a bonus above and beyond their set hourly rate once the employee's proficiency hit certain performance goals. This way an employee would always be guaranteed at least his or her hourly rate while working towards higher levels of productivity. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights by: Study.com
Views: 2093 Forever Suspicious
#2 - How Good Managers Promote Productivity | Business 101: Principles of Management
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management Download free notes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 How Good Managers Promote Productivity Managerial skills are necessary for a manager to perform their job successfully. There are three different types of managerial skills, which include technical skills, human skills, and conceptual skills. Technical skills are the specific skill set used to perform a particular job, such as writing a computer program, developing a budget, or analyzing sales trends. These skills are most important for low-level managers because of how closely they work with employees performing the actual job functions. Human skills include the ability for managers to work with, motivate, encourage, empathize, and communicate with their employees. These skills are important for all levels of management. Conceptual skills are the manager's ability to think analytically about the organization and how to most effectively accomplish its goals. These skills become increasingly more important the higher the management level. ---------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Forever Suspicious | Soumy Nayak
Views: 3478 Forever Suspicious
#15 - Chester Barnard: Informal Organizations and Acceptance Theory| Principles of Management
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #15 - Chester Barnard: Informal Organizations and Acceptance Theory| Principles of Management Chester Barnard believed that formal organizations are made up of informal groups. These informal groups evolve to become the informal organization. The group's beliefs and values establish the organizational culture and determine, to a large extent, the formal acceptance of authority. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Basics of management, principle of management, business 101, management principle, organization, business, management, Informal Groups, Acceptance of Authority, Informal Organizations, Acceptance Theory, Chester Barnard, Organizations, business management, managing the organization, organisation management,
Views: 2913 Forever Suspicious
#-10 - Henri Fayol's Management Principles : Managing Departmental Task Organization | Business 101
 
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Business 101 - Principles of Management #10 Henri Fayol's Management Principles: Managing Departmental Task Organization Free Notes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 Fayol's 14 Principles of Management serve the organization as a whole. By dividing the work into specialized and specific jobs, workers are able to work more efficiently. Small management units who oversee functional areas of the organization are now able to assign work and hold workers accountable for their production. This makes it easier to measure productivity. Once a system of accountability is in place and productivity can be monitored, it is easier to determine who is performing and who is not performing. Managers are able to selectively and individually discipline workers who fall short of goals quickly and in the correct measure. Having just one manager assigned to a team takes away any task confusion. ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights by: Study.com
Views: 2530 Forever Suspicious
#14 - Mary Parker Follett: People-Oriented, Group-Network Management| Principles of Management
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #14 - Mary Parker Follett: People-Oriented, Group-Network Management| Principles of Management Mary Parker Follett was a social worker and management consultant who talked about issues like the importance of people-oriented, group network management through group interaction and shared power between managers and employees in business. This evolved to become a form of participative leadership. People-oriented management is a participative leadership style that involves including employees in making important company decisions by equally balancing leader and employee power. This orientation towards shared power and ownership of responsibility makes resolving conflicts much easier. Group networking is also participative in that it involves groups of people within the organization with equal power over outcomes. These groups work on separate parts of an organization, and each group contributes pieces together to achieve one organizational goal. Both people-orientation and group network management involve working in groups to achieve common goals. Groups use a form of communication known as group interactions. These interactions are positive collaboration between employees who are socially attracted to one another, have shared goals and have a unique identity that sets them apart from others in the organization. They lead to good communication needed for better decision-making. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com -----------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 2724 Forever Suspicious
#35 – How Companies Become Learning Organizations? | Five disciplines by Peter Senge
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #35 – How Companies Become Learning Organizations? | Five disciplines by Peter Senge The learning organization symbolizes a company where its members are constantly learning from everything they do. New knowledge is continuously acquired, shared, and applied among organizational members in decision making and work processes. All members take an active role in identifying and resolving work-related issues so that the individual and the organizational goals can be accomplished. The idea of the learning organization became popular largely by Peter Senge's book The Fifth discipline. Senge proposed the following five disciplines are characteristic of a learning Organization: personal mastery, mental models, developing a shared vision, team learning, and systems thinking. The benefits of becoming a learning organization include: - Being superior to competitors - Being capable of imagining and developing a product line of the future - Each employee's ideas and perspectives are appreciated and welcomed - Information is communicated freely - Promotes a sense of ownership and appreciation among all employees - Promotes innovation - Allows the organization to attract and retain the best talent - Members are encouraged to improve their personal skills and qualities - Members learn a variety of skills, making it possible for employees to perform and appreciate the roles and tasks of others - Promotes improved social interaction and interpersonal skills in employees - Becoming and maintaining the learning organization status requires a great deal of dedication, commitment, education, time, energy, and other resources. Many organizations are not up to the challenges associated with being a learning organization. However, organizations, such as General Electric, Pizza Hut, Honeywell, Microsoft, Apple, and the Toyota Motor Company, have had long-term success as learning organizations and serve as testimony of the benefits of continually learning. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Peter Senge, personal mastery, mental models, developing a shared vision, team learning, systems thinking, The Fifth Discipline, learning organization, Benefits of Becoming a Learning Organization, traditional organizations, Organization management, Learning Organizations, Organizational change, planned change process, Change in Organizations, Need to Change,
Views: 1277 Forever Suspicious
#22 - Quantitative School of Management: Improving Managerial Decision-Making
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #22 - Quantitative School of Management: Improving Managerial Decision-Making | Principles of Management The impact of the quantitative school of management has been tremendous. Literally, it has changed the way managers look at and address issues and make decisions. Before it was developed, managers would go a lot more on gut feeling and history to make decisions. While that worked for some time, as the world grew more competitive, managers had to solve problems for than just guessing. Think of a situation where you have an older person and a younger one. In today's world, if there is a problem to solve, and the older person presents his or her thoughts based on gut instinct and history (this would be the old classic approach), while the younger person brings in data and systems and reports that show trends. Whom do you think the executive team of the company is going to listen to? So, the quantitative school of management is comprised of many different parts: The quantitative school of management strives to combine classic management theory and behaviour science through the uses of statistical models and simulations. Classic management theory focused on how to find the best possible way for workers to perform their tasks and was the predecessor to the quantitative school of management theory. From there, the quantitative school of management theory developed into four areas: Management science encourages and supports managers in using math and statistics to solve problems. Operations management focuses on managing the process of blending materials, employees in the form of labour and capital (money and equipment) into useful goods or services. Management information systems organize data from the past, present and what could be projected from sources within the company and outside the company and process it into usable information. Systems management theory takes inputs, puts them through a transformation process, produces outputs and finally gives feedback on the systems the company is using. All this allows us to look at problems with more data and make better decisions. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com -----------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1304 Forever Suspicious
#20 - Two Types of Managers: Theory X & Theory Y| Business 101: Principles of Management
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #20 - Two Types of Managers: Theory X & Theory Y| Business 101: Principles of Management Douglas McGregor believed that there were two types of managers: Theory X and Theory Y. The role of the Theory X manager is to coerce and control employees to work towards organizational goals. The Theory X manager assumes employees hate the idea of having to go to work and do so only to earn a paycheck and the security it offers. They are inherently lazy, lack ambition and prefer to be directed on what to do rather than assume responsibility on their own. They are self-centred and care only about themselves and not the organization or its goals, making it necessary for a manager to coerce, control, direct or threatened with punishment in order to get them to work towards organizational goals. They also dislike change and tend to resist it at all costs. The Theory Y managers believe their role is to help develop an employee's potential so that he can work towards common organizational goals. The Theory Y manager assumes that employees accept work as a normal part of their day right next to recreation and rest. They are not lazy at all. In fact, when proper motivations and rewards are in place, employees are not only willing but purposely driven to seek out responsibility and challenges on their own. The employees are full of potential, and it is through their own creativity, ingenuity and imagination that organizational goals are met. McGregor cautioned both types of managers against what he called self-fulfilling prophecies, whereby an employee will act just as the manager assumed he or she would due to the manager's own actions and behaviours. McGregor acknowledged both types of managers as being a legitimate means of motivating employees, but he felt that you would get much better results through the use of Theory Y rather than Theory X. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com -----------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1291 Forever Suspicious
#43 – Bruce Tuckman's five stages of GROUP DEVELOPMENT
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #43 – Bruce Tuckman's five stages of GROUP DEVELOPMENT: Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing & Adjourning The best known universal scheme for group development was advanced by Bruce Tuckman, which included four stages: forming, storming, norming and performing. A fifth stage was later added called adjourning. - The forming stage represents a time where the group is just getting started and coming together and is characterized with anxiety and uncertainty. Members are cautious with their behaviour and avoid conflict, controversy and personal opinions. The focus for group members during the forming stage is to become familiar with each other and their purpose. - The storming stage is where conflict and competition are at its greatest because group members feel confident and begin to address some of the more important issues surrounding the group. During the storming phase, all members have an increased need for clarification before they are able to move on to the next stage. - The norming stage is a time where group members become a cohesive unit. Morale is high as group members actively acknowledge the talents, skills and experience that each member brings to the group. A sense of community is established, and the group remains focused on the group's purpose and goal. - The performing stage is marked by high productivity. The overall objective of the group during the performing stage is to complete their mission and fulfil their purpose though goal achievement. After a group has completed their task they must dissolve and disband from both the task and group members. - This adjourning stage is used to wrap up activities of the group and provide a sense of closure to its members. This stage can be difficult for some, but members are encouraged to take what they learn from each group they are part of to aid future groups in the progression towards the performing stage. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Bruce Tuckman, five stages of GROUP DEVELOPMENT, Forming, Storming, Norming, Performing, Adjourning, GROUP DEVELOPMENT, Stages of Group Development, how group starts, how groups are made in organisation, Bruce Tuckman's five stages of GROUP DEVELOPMENT, groups in organization,
Views: 1311 Forever Suspicious
#19 - The Needs Theory: Motivating Employees with Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #19 - The Needs Theory: Motivating Employees with Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs| Principles of Management Needs theories attempt to identify the internal factors that motivate an individual's behaviour and are based on the premise that people are motivated by unfulfilled needs. One of the most popular needs theories is Abraham Maslow's hierarchy of needs theory. Maslow proposed that motivation is the result of a person's attempt at fulfilling five basic needs: - Physiological, safety, social, esteem and self-actualization. Physiological needs are those needs required for human survival such as air, food, water, shelter, clothing and sleep. - Safety needs include those needs that provide a person with a sense of security and well-being. Personal security, financial security, good health and protection from accidents, harm and their adverse effects are all included in safety needs. - Social needs, also called love and belonging, refer to the need to feel a sense of belonging and acceptance. Social needs are important to humans so that they do not feel alone, isolated and depressed. Friendships, family and intimacy all work to fulfil social needs. - Esteem needs refer to the need for self-esteem and respect, with self-respect being slightly more important than gaining respect and admiration from others. - Self-actualization needs to describe a person's need to reach his or her full potential. Maslow's theory is based on two principles. Progression principle suggests that lower-level needs must be met before higher-level needs. Deficit principle claims that once a need is satisfied it is no longer a motivator because an individual will take action only to satisfy unmet needs. As a manager, you should review the specific steps that can be taken to provide your employees with a means of satisfying all of Maslow's needs. Remember, a motivated employee is an asset to any organization and it is up to you to provide motivators to your employees. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com -----------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1583 Forever Suspicious
#32 – Kurt Lewin's Force-Field Analysis Change Model| Why is Organizational Changes Difficult?
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #32 – Kurt Lewin's Force-Field Analysis Change Model| Why is Organizational Changes Difficult? Kurt Lewin's force field analysis change model was designed to weigh the driving and restraining forces that affect change in organizations. The 'force field' can be described as two opposing forces working for and against change. In this lesson, we'll learn how to analyse the force field. Driving forces are those seeking change while resisting forces are those seeking to maintain the status quo. Forces, whether driving or resisting, are a mix of people, habits, customs and attitudes. Lewin's force field analysis change model works by investigating the balance of power, then determining the key players involved in decision-making and devising ways to influence them to accept change. The force field analysis involves: - Stating the problem by determining the current situation in terms of the conflict at hand. This may also involve determining the desired state. Other things to consider are where the current situation will go if no action is taken. Defining objectives by listing the expectations or outcomes of change. If the change occurs, equilibrium, or balance of power, has been achieved. - Determining resisting forces to identify negative or resistant forces to change. - Comparing the strategy against organizational objectives to determine whether the strategies used are in line with the desired objectives. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: organizational change, planned change process, Change in Organizations, Need to Change, reasons for change in organisation, Organisational Changes, Types of Internal Organizational Change, changes is organisation, Why Organizations Change?, Developing change goals, change agent, develop the change plan, Kurt Lewin, Kurt Lewin's Force Field Analysis, Lewin’s model of change, Force-Field Analysis Change Model, steps of Kurt Lewin's model, Lewin's force field analysis, Kurt Lewin's force field analysis change model, Determining resistant forces, steps involved in Lewin's force field analysis change model, Lewin's change model, lewins approach of organisational change,
Views: 1711 Forever Suspicious
#16 - Neoclassical Theory of Management: The Human Relations Approach
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #16 - Neoclassical Theory of Management: The Human Relations Approach| Principles of Management The neoclassical theory, which includes the human relations movement and the behavioural movement, encompasses approaches and theories that focus on the human side of an organization. The neoclassical theory was an attempt at incorporating the behavioural sciences into management thought in order to solve the problems caused by classical theory practices. Emphasis shifted from production, structures, and technology to a focus on social interaction. Neoclassical theorists concentrated on answering questions related to the best way to motivate, structure, and support employees within the organization. Managers were encouraged to create supportive social systems and facilitate the personal development of their workers. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com -----------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 2490 Forever Suspicious
#18 - The Hawthorne Effect: The Study of Employee Productivity| Principles of Management
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #18 - The Hawthorne Effect: The Study of Employee Productivity| Principles of Management The Hawthorne effect is a psychological phenomenon in which participants in behavioural studies change their behaviour or performance in response to being observed by the individual conducting the study. In the workplace, the Hawthorne effect can explain how the more attention an employee receives from managers, co-workers and customers, the higher the level of effort and employee productivity. Essentially, productivity increases when employees think that they are being watched or observed closely. The term 'Hawthorne effect' was derived from the location where the phenomenon was first witnessed during a series of experiments designed to find ways to increase worker productivity. The Hawthorne experiments consisted of two studies: one on lighting levels at Western Electric Company's Hawthorne Works and the other on offering special privileges to five bank workers. What was not blatantly obvious at the time soon became a staple of behavioural management theory. That is, it is important to consider the social and human relations needs of workers. Such needs have a direct effect on employee performance and levels of productivity. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com -----------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1568 Forever Suspicious
#21 - Modern Theory of Management | Business 101: Principles of Management
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #21 - Modern Theory of Management | Business 101: Principles of Management So as you see, each of these approaches to management can stand on its own, but it is best to have them all working together, as every company needs them to be present. When we look at a football team, you could indeed put a team on the field of all quarterbacks, but that is probably not the best team to put out there. No, instead you use linemen, running backs, wide receivers, etc. to build a complete team. The same is true for blending these different types of approaches. The Quantitative Approach: The approach is centred on statistics and mathematical techniques. The Systems Approach: This approach is focused on systems that, when put together, make a whole unit. The Contingency Approach: The approach that believes there is no one system or approach to managing an paycheck. Now hopefully you can see that a company needs finance and data analysis people (quantitative approach), process and system people (systems approach) and contingency people (contingency approach) threatened. There has to be ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com -----------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1679 Forever Suspicious
Best Android Movie downloader App
 
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Download apps here https://www.dropbox.com/sh/riro8m7b4glfif4/AAAngvy1iYGTl45P0aXb5Npqa?dl=0 If you are using your regular browser to download movies or searching some links like free download latest movies, 2018 full movie. That is a waste of time instead you can watch this tiny video and learn how to download almost any Hollywood movie with full HD, good audio quality least file size. And the best pause and restore features in any android device with both wifi or Mobile datapack There are 2 apps used in this video: 1. FLUD : https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.delphicoder.flud 2. YIFY BROWSER : https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=vinitm.yts
Views: 79092 Forever Suspicious
#28 – Types of Internal Organizational Change: Structural, Strategic, People, and Process
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #28 – Types of Internal Organizational Change: Structural, Strategic, People, and Process Reasons for change can be attributed to an organization's external environment as well as their internal environment. This lesson focused specifically on those changes that occur in a company's internal environment, including structural, strategic, people and process changes. Structural changes are those changes made to the organization's structure that might stem from internal or external factors and typically affect how the company is run. Strategic change involves making changes to the overall goals, purpose, strategy or mission of an organization. People changes are directed towards improving employee performance, skills, attitudes, behaviour and loyalty to the organization, as well as to enhance manager-subordinate relationships, group cohesion and employee sense of achievement. Process changes are used to improve overall workflow efficiency and productivity within an organization. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Basics of management, principle of management, business 101, management principle, organization, business, management, Internal environment, external environment, environmental scanning, factors that influence the organization, SWOT analysis, Navigating Change in Organizations, Change in Organizations, Structural Change, Strategic Change, People changes, Process changes, reasons for change in organisation, Organisational Changes, Types of Internal Organizational Change, changes is organisation,
Views: 1935 Forever Suspicious
#11 - Fayol's Theories on Staff Management and Worker Satisfaction - Business 101
 
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Business 101 - Principles of Management #11 Fayol's Theories on Staff Management and Worker Satisfaction Free Notes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 In summary, Fayol believed that allowing workers to be part of the decision-making when appropriate is important for the overall organization. When roles are clearly defined and a chain of command is clear and present, workers understand their role in the organization. A clean and safe work environment increases worker satisfaction. The same theory applies to reward systems. Discipline and rewards should be administered appropriately and in the right measure. This will reduce turnover. Employees will feel empowered as a team to take healthy risks. As a result, organizational objectives can be met. -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Presented By: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights by: Study.com
Views: 1635 Forever Suspicious
#23 - Operations Management: Focusing on Production Efficiency & Customer Satisfaction
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #23 - Operations Management: Focusing on Production Efficiency & Customer Satisfaction| Principles of Management Our starfish company does indeed have different arms: -Operations - Finance - Marketing - Sales - Human Resources But these arms must all work together to make the starfish, for lack of a better word, live. And one of the most important aspects of our starfish is the operations arm, which focuses on: Materials planning: the coordination of purchasing and delivery of raw materials to make the final product Process planning: designing the processes required to ensure the product can be made in the shortest amount of time, with as little waste and as efficiently as possible Capital requirements: the portion of operations management that deals with buildings and machinery Human capital: the management of the employees that help run the facility All of these elements help the organization do what it has to do, and that is produce a quality product. Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm going to get some leftovers before Uncle Tony eats all of them. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com -----------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1165 Forever Suspicious
#6 - Bureaucracy: Max Weber's Theory | Business 101 - Principles of Management
 
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Business 101 - Principles of Management Bureaucracy: Max Weber's Theory of Impersonal Management Download Free notes: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 Max Weber disliked the idea of managing an organization informally. He believed in a much more rigid, formalized structure known as a bureaucracy. The characteristics of a bureaucracy include 1) A well-defined formal hierarchy and chain of command; 2) Management by rules and regulations; 3) Division of labour and work specialization; 4) Managers should maintain an impersonal relationship with employees; 5) Competence, not personality, is the basis for job appointment and 6) Formal written records. --------------------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights by Study.com
Views: 4343 Forever Suspicious
Modi ke secrets : How well do you know NARENDRA MODI?
 
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(Subtitles are available in English) This video is merely a slideshow created on Narendra Modi. Prime Mister of India and it's about his 10 most unknown strange facts that will shock your mind. There are top 10 rare facts about Modi Ji which includes his marriage! Find out who is Narendra Modi's wife? Our PM went to the Himalayas, Really What for? Recently his decision for demonetization made him one of the most influencing person of the year. Find out who is following Narendra Modi and discover his untold truths! Watch : How to find the fake note 2000! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lB87i0uU4Rw Watch : World's Most Funniest Pics of the USA President Donald Trump! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fW26_hwRb34&t=4s ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Disclaimer : I'm definitely not the one took these pics or edited them. These are my views and collection from the internet, if you feel that they should not be there in this video let me know directly. Created By: Soumy Nayak | ForeverSuspicious ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Search tags (Please ignore): Narendra Modi facts, Narendra modi's marriage, modi's wife, Indian PM latest news, news about Narendra Modi, Narendra Modi speech, Indian prime minister, Indian politics, news about Modi, narendra modi images, secrets about narendra modi, rare facts about narendra modi,
Views: 2914 Forever Suspicious
#4 - Four Functions of Management | Business 101 - Principles of Management
 
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Business 101 - Principles of Management 4 Functions of Management: Planning, Organizing, Leading & Controlling | Business 101 - Principles of Management Download Free notes : https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 There are four functions of management that span across all industries. They include planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. You should think about the four functions as a process, where each step builds on the others. Managers must first plan, then organize according to that plan, lead others to work towards the plan, and finally evaluate the effectiveness of the plan. Planning is the First step whereby a manager creates a detailed action plan aimed at some organizational goal. Organizing is the second step, which involves the manager determining how to distribute resources and arrange employees according to the plan. Leading is the third step that is accomplished by communicating, motivating, inspiring, and encouraging employees towards a higher level of productivity. Controlling is the final function of management in which the manager, once a plan has been carried out, evaluates the results against the goals. If a goal is not being met, the manager must also take any necessary corrective action needed to continue to work towards that goal. Some have added a fifth function for managers known as staffing. Staffing is the task of evaluating, recruiting, selecting, training and placing appropriate individuals into defined job roles. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Presented By: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights owned by Study.com
Views: 3805 Forever Suspicious
#30 – The Planned Change Process | How to Make successful Organizational Changes?
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #30 – The Planned Change Process | How to Make successful Organizational Changes? Because change is often one of the most challenging events than an organization will go through, managers are encouraged to create and follow a logical sequence of steps to ensure the objectives of the change are accomplished. The planned change process is typically made up of the following steps: - Recognize the need for change - Develop change goals - Appoint an agent - Assess the current climate - Develop a change plan and method for implementation - Implement the plan - Evaluate the success of the plan at reaching the change goals Recognizing the need for change requires managers at all levels to be aware of the internal and external forces that potentially compromise the success and long-term sustainability of the organization. Developing change goals provides managers with the objective or expectation of how the change will respond to whatever internal or external forces are driving the need to change. Once a manager recognizes that a change must happen in the organization and develops the change goals, he or she needs to select someone to carry out that change, known as the change agent. One thing that change agents are particularly good at is assessing the current climate of the organization to determine how ready the organization and its members are for the change. The change agent will gather information to help prepare the organization for the change. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Basics of management, principle of management, business 101, management principle, organization, business, management, Factors that influence the organization, organizational change, planned change process, Change in Organizations, Need to Change, reasons for change in organisation, Organisational Changes, Types of Internal Organizational Change, changes is organisation, factors that influence organizational change, types of challenges associated with organizational change, Managerial Challenges Caused by Organizational Change, Why Organizations Change?, Developing change goals, change agent, develop the change plan,
Views: 1492 Forever Suspicious
#29 – Why Organizations Change? | Managerial Challenges Caused by Organizational Change
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #29 – Why Organizations Change – Reasons, Factors, Types & Challenges | Managerial Challenges Caused by Organizational Change Organizational change is the restructuring that takes place organization-wide. Change occurs from external factors like political, social, technological or economic changes. Changes in the internal environment can mean changes to processes and systems, procedures, and attitudes, like new ways to perform tasks. When managers implement change, some of their challenges are employee-related or process related. Employee-related challenges might include lower trust levels, uncertainty and a lack of understanding for the need to change. Process-related challenges for management might be training a resistant staff to rethink the way they do things. The good news is that there are ways to overcome the challenges. Managers should openly communicate change so employees can ease into it, work with employees in mutual decision making, build teams by reinforcing the new culture, and make employees feel as secure as possible. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Basics of management, principle of management, business 101, management principle, organization, business, management, factors that influence the organization, organizational change, Navigating Change in Organizations, Change in Organizations, Structural Change, Strategic Change, People changes, Process changes, reasons for change in organisation, Organisational Changes, Types of Internal Organizational Change, changes is organisation, factors that influence organizational change, types of challenges associated with organizational change, Managerial Challenges Caused by Organizational Change, Why Organizations Change?
Views: 1456 Forever Suspicious
#13 - Classical Administrative School of Management: Managing the Organization
 
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Administrative management was developed out of the desire to establish management as a profession that focused on the organization and operation of a business. Management theorists such as Max Weber, Henri Fayol, Mary Parker Follett, and Chester Barnard were instrumental in developing the principles and practices of administrative management. Each of these contributions will be discussed in other lessons of this course, but in general, their focus was on things such as: - organizational principles - the philosophy of management clarification of business terms and concepts relating to the management - social responsibilities of management - functional responsibilities of management - organizational structure - leadership, power, and authority. When compared to scientific management, which was concerned with the best way for individual jobs to be done, administrative management offered a more general approach that focused on management processes and principles of an entire organization. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Copyrights and Credits: Study.com -----------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 2184 Forever Suspicious
#26 – What really is TQM? Kaizen & Reengineering Approaches | Quality School of Management
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #26 – What really is TQM? Kaizen & Reengineering Approaches | Quality School of Management TQM is all encompassing and takes an entire company's commitment to quality. It is the driving force behind how all companies view their customer experience. As it is deployed, company cultures will change, new processes will be developed and everyone in the company will need to work to be more efficient at what they do so quality can indeed improve. Indeed, as the Internet brings us all closer and closer together, and we can easily share our likes and dislikes about products, TQM will continue to evolve as well to keep pace. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Basics of management, principle of management, business 101, management principle, organization, business, management, How to improve quality, total quality management, tqm, Kaizen, Reengineering, total quality, improve total product quality, history of TQM, how to deliver a better product, quality management approach,
Views: 1549 Forever Suspicious
#34 – How to apply Kotter's 8-Step Model | Example of Organizational Change Model
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #34 – How to apply Kotter's 8-Step Model | Example of John Kotter's 8-Step Organizational Change Model’s Application Carl used John Kotter's eight-step change model to introduce a new interior shampooing service at his carwash. Specific steps of the model include: establish a sense of urgency, create the guiding coalition, develop a vision and strategy, communicate the change vision, empower broad-based action, generate short-term wins, consolidate gains to produce more change and anchor change in the organizational culture. Each step of the Kotter model was discussed using Carl's carwash as the contextual example for making lasting change at the carwash. However, Kotter's model can be universally applied in a variety of change situations to promote the successful implementation of change in any organization. Kotter's eight-step change model including: create urgency, form a powerful coalition, create change vision, communicate the vision, remove obstacles, create short-term wins, build on the change, and anchor the change in organizational culture. John Kotter's change model includes the following eight steps: establish a sense of urgency, create the guiding coalition, develop a vision and strategy, communicate the change vision, empower broad-based action, generate short-term wins, consolidate gains to produce more change, and anchor the change in organizational culture. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: organizational change, planned change process, Change in Organizations, Need to Change, reasons for change in organisation, Organisational Changes, Types of Internal Organizational Change, changes is organisation, Why Organizations Change?, Developing change goals, change agent, develop the change plan, John Kotter, Kotter’s eight step model, john Kotter’s model of management, Force-Field Analysis Change Model, steps of Kurt Lewin's model, Lewin's force field analysis, John Kotter's eight-step change model, Kotter's 8-Step Change Model, Kotter's Model of Organizational Change, establishing a sense of urgency, Creating the Guiding Coalition, how to apply Kotter’s model, use kotters model, example of Kotter’s model
Views: 1742 Forever Suspicious
#7 - Henry Ford's Model T Production Line | Classical Scientific School of Management
 
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Business 101 - Principles of Management #7 Classical Scientific School of Management Download Free notes : https://www.dropbox.com/sh/w7t41w420d2uuex/AAC42pW6GlkRRqEeKHcnDr0pa?dl=0 Classical scientific management theory is focused on the 'science' of creating specialized work processes and workforce skills to complete production tasks efficiently. Contributors to the scientific management theory were Frederick Taylor, Henry Gantt, and Frank and Lillian Gilbreth. It was from these individuals' work that the four principles of scientific management was developed, which included: 1. Management should provide workers with a precise, scientific approach for how to complete individualized tasks. 2. Management should carefully choose and train each employee on one specific task. 3. Management should communicate with employees to ensure that the method used to complete the task is, in fact, the most productive and efficient. 4. Management should create an appropriate division of labour. Henry Ford provides a good example of classical scientific management with his development of the assembly line used to produce his Model T. The assembly line and similar scientific management principles are still in use today ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Forever Suspicious | Soumy Nayak Copyrights by Study.com
Views: 4069 Forever Suspicious
#37 –What are Organizational Business Structures? - Mechanistic & Organic
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #37 –What are Organizational Business Structures? - Mechanistic & Organic The organizational structure refers to the type of framework a company uses to distinguish power and authority, roles and responsibilities, and the manner in which information flows through the organization. There are two basic forms of organizational structure: mechanistic and organic structures. A mechanistic structure, also known as a bureaucratic structure, describes an organizational structure that is based on a formal, centralized network. The mechanistic structure is best suited for companies that operate in a stable and certain environment. Characteristics of mechanistic structures include: - Well-defined hierarchy - Top-level managers make the majority of decisions - Individualized job specialization - Low integration between functional areas or departments Organic structures are used in organizations that face unstable and dynamic environments and need to quickly adapt to change. Characteristics of organic structures include: - Lateral communication - Highly integrated and dependent functional areas - Do not rely on standardized processes and procedures - Multiple tasks are differentiated to one person - Decision making is decentralized to allow for complex decision-making processes Power and authority are awarded to lower-level employees ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Mechanistic structure, bureaucratic structure, organizational structure, mechanistic and organic structures, Organizational Business Structures, Tom Burns, G. M. Stalker,
Views: 102 Forever Suspicious
Creating Freelancer Account in Freelancer.com & Upwork.com | Make Money online #2
 
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#1 Previous Video: https://youtu.be/NVCnYG3S-6A Series: How to make money online #2 - Create your freelancer account to various sites This video will help you create your new freelancing accounts in most popular freelancing websites. Even though creating an account is not a tedious process but still, to avoid all kinds of mistakes and make a perfect account for you to make money online. (If you have any questions post them in comment) So, if you are ready to become a freelancer go ahead and subscribe to my channel and watch the whole series and be your own boss to work without any restriction and earn from home! Authour: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious
Views: 4626 Forever Suspicious
#46 –LEADERSHIP Explained | How Leader is different from Manager? | Roles of a Leader
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #46 –LEADERSHIP Explained | How Leader is different from Manager? | Roles of a Leader | How to be a Good Leader? Leadership is the action of leading employees to achieve goals. It plays an important role in employee performance and productivity. A good leader: Sets a clear vision by influencing employees to understand and accept the future state of the organization Motivates employees by finding out enough about their needs and wants, giving them what they need and providing praise for a job well done Guides employees by defining their role in the work process, providing them with the tools needed to perform and participating in their effort along the way Builds morale by pulling everyone together to work towards a common goal A leader can take on two different roles. A formal leader is an officially assigned position given to someone based on his or her ability to perform the job. An informal leadership takes on an unofficial role, and the role is based on his or her charismatic influence over a group of people. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: How to be a good leader, leader and manager, leadership, roles of a leader, leadership, Leadership in Organizations, how to become a leader, leader and manager difference, A Leader's Role, leader in organisation
Views: 23 Forever Suspicious
#33 – Kotter's 8-Step Change Model of Management| Organizational Change model by John Kotter
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #33 – Kotter's 8-Step Change Model of Management| Organizational Change model by John Kotter Kotter's eight-step change model including: create urgency, form a powerful coalition, create change vision, communicate the vision, remove obstacles, create short-term wins, build on the change, and anchor the change in organizational culture. John Kotter's change model includes the following eight steps: establish a sense of urgency, create the guiding coalition, develop a vision and strategy, communicate the change vision, empower broad-based action, generate short-term wins, consolidate gains to produce more change, and anchor the change in organizational culture. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: organizational change, planned change process, Change in Organizations, Need to Change, reasons for change in organisation, Organisational Changes, Types of Internal Organizational Change, changes is organisation, Why Organizations Change?, Developing change goals, change agent, develop the change plan, John Kotter, Kotter’s eight step model, john Kotter’s model of management, Force-Field Analysis Change Model, steps of Kurt Lewin's model, Lewin's force field analysis, John Kotter's eight-step change model, Kotter's 8-Step Change Model, Kotter's Model of Organizational Change, establishing a sense of urgency, Creating the Guiding Coalition,
Views: 1443 Forever Suspicious
#31 – Kurt Lewis's 3-Stage Model of Change: Unfreezing, Changing & Refreezing | Simplest approach
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #31 – Kurt Lewin's 3-Stage Model of Change: Unfreezing, Changing & Refreezing | Simplest approach for Organizational Changes? Kurt Lewin developed a change model involving three steps: unfreezing, changing and refreezing. For Lewin, the process of change entails creating the perception that a change is needed, then moving toward the new, desired level of behaviour and, finally, solidifying that new behaviour as the norm. The goal during the unfreezing stage is to create an awareness of how the status quo, or current level of acceptability, is hindering the organization in some way. The idea is that the more we know about a change and the more we feel that it is necessary and urgent, the more motivated we are to accept the change. Once people are unfrozen they can begin to move into the implementation phase, also called the changing stage. During the changing stage, people begin to learn the new behaviours, processes and ways of thinking. The more prepared they are for this step, the easier it is to complete. Lewin called the final stage of his change model freezing, but many refer to it as refreezing to symbolize the act of reinforcing, stabilizing and solidifying the new state after the change. The changes made to organizational processes, goals, structure, offerings or people are accepted and refrozen as the new norm or status quo. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Factors that influence the organization, organizational change, planned change process, Change in Organizations, Need to Change, reasons for change in organisation, Organisational Changes, Types of Internal Organizational Change, changes is organisation, types of challenges associated with organizational change, Managerial Challenges Caused by Organizational Change, Why Organizations Change?, Developing change goals, change agent, develop the change plan, Kurt Lewin, Kurt Lewin's 3-Stage Model , Lewin’s model of change, 3-Stage Model of Change, steps of Kurt Lewin's change model, Unfreezing, Changing, Refreezing, Lewin's Three Steps
Views: 1268 Forever Suspicious
#27 –Organisational Changes & SWOT Analysis–Internal and External Factors
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #27 –Organisational Changes & SWOT Analysis–Internal and External Factors The internal environment of an organization refers to events, factors, people, systems, structures, and conditions inside the organization that are generally under the control of the company. The company's mission statement, organizational culture, and style of leadership are factors that are typically associated with the internal environment of an organization. The external environment are those factors that occur outside of the company that cause change in organizations and are, for the most part, beyond the control of the company. Customers, competition, the economy, technology, political and social conditions, and resources are common external factors that influence the organization. In order for managers to react to the forces of internal and external environments, they rely on environmental scanning. Environmental scanning refers to the monitoring of an organization's internal and external environments for early signs that a change may be needed. Environmental scans allow managers to use the knowledge gained during the scanning process to decide what steps, or changes, the organizations need to take to create and/or maintain a competitive advantage. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Basics of management, principle of management, business 101, management principle, organization, business, management, Internal environment, external environment, environmental scanning, factors that influence the organization, SWOT analysis, Navigating Change in Organizations, Change in Organizations, Structural Change, Strategic Change, People changes, Process changes, reasons for change in organisation, Organisational Changes
Views: 1256 Forever Suspicious
#25 - Systems Management Theory| Business 101: Principles of Management
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #25 - Systems Management Theory| Business 101: Principles of Management The systems management theory believes that a system is a collection of parts brought together to accomplish some end goal or objective. Also, within that thought process, we have different system types: - Open System: A system that continually interacts with the environment around it. - Closed System: Is the opposite of an open system. It is a system (or company) independent of the environment around it. - Subsystem: A system that is part of a larger system. These types of systems can operate with synergy or entropy. Just because the system is present does not mean it will run smoothly. What system an organization uses is dependent on the type of product they produce and how the company wishes to run. No matter what, at the end of the day, every company has to have a system in order to function - it is just a matter of what type of system they choose. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Basics of management, principle of management, business 101, management principle, organization, business, management, Synergy, systems management theory, how systems operate through synergy, entropy, Company and the System, Open System, Closed System, Subsystem,
Views: 1382 Forever Suspicious
#48 – The Transactional Leader – Action/Reaction Rule | The Process of becoming a Leader
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #48 – The Transactional Leader – Action/Reaction Rule | The Process of becoming a Leader Much like Newton's third law of motion, transactional leadership runs under the premise of actions and reactions. The transactional leader views management as a sequence of transactions where the actions of subordinates result in either a reward or punishment. Those individuals who do conform to the requests of the transactional leader are rewarded and anyone who does not is punished. The authority of the transactional leader is based on the chain of command where the subordinates are expected to follow the directions of those who hold higher-level positions in the organization. The benefits of transactional leadership include: Clearly defined roles and responsibilities Healthy motivation to work towards organizational goals A high level of employee responsibility and accountability To monitor this accountability, the transactional leader uses management by exception, which can be either passive or active. The transactional leader who uses passive management by exception will monitor employee performance closely and intervene only when an employee is not meeting the expectation, often resulting in a punishment. Conversely, the transactional leader who uses an active management by exception will monitor employee performance closely, watch for slight deviations and quickly intervene to take corrective action to prevent further mistakes. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: How to be a good leader, leadership, Leadership in Organizations, how to become a leader, leader and manager difference, A Leader's Role, leader in organisation, transformational leader, Idealized influence, charismatic leader ,best leader, Charisma, action/reaction rule, Transactional Leader, transactional leadership, Max Weber, Bernard Bass, extrinsic rewards, transactional leadership
Views: 81 Forever Suspicious
#56 –The Blake Mouton Managerial Grid: Five Leadership Styles
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #56 –The Blake Mouton Managerial Grid: Five Leadership Styles| What is your Predominant leadership style? The Blake and Mouton Managerial Grid is an x/y-axis grid that represents the degree to which managers have a concern for production and for people. The degree to which a manager has concern for either or both determines the manager's leadership style. There are five leadership styles represented on the grid. The country club leadership style is plotted at the top-left corner of the grid and shows the most concern for people but the least concern for production. This leadership style assumes that if people are happy in their job, they will naturally work harder. This leadership style is not very effective for production. The impoverished leadership style is plotted at the bottom-left corner of the grid and shows the least concern for production or for people. As a result, production is low and employees feel no satisfaction in their work. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: How to be a good leader, leadership, Leadership in Organizations, A Leader's Role, leader in organisation, transformational leader, Idealized influence, charismatic leader, best leader, Charisma, action/reaction rule, Transactional Leader, transactional leadership, transactional leadership, types of leaders, Authoritarian Leader, Autocratic Leader, Charismatic Leader, Most liked leader, Situational Leader, effective leaders, Bureaucratic Leader, bureaucratic leadership, Blake Mouton Managerial Grid, Five Leadership Styles, team leader, Middle-of-the-Road Leader, Impoverished Leader, country club leader, Produce leader, Non-Risky leader
Views: 43 Forever Suspicious
#39 – How Authority works? Authority in Centralized & Decentralized Organizations
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #39 – How Authority works? Authority in Centralized & Decentralized Organizations In a centralized organization, authority is top-down through a chain of command. The number of hierarchical tiers needed to channel work will determine the span of control amongst each manager. A chain of command is an order through which authority is shared from top to bottom, while span of control is the number of employees that can be managed at one time. The type of tasks the employees are assigned determines span of control. Variable work is work that changes daily and requires a smaller span of control. Fixed work is work that is the same every day, with few changes. The span of control can be up to twenty employees. Conversely, in a decentralized organization, authority is assigned at different levels in the hierarchy. Managers delegate tasks to lower-level managers and assign responsibilities and accountability for the outcomes. Managers in a decentralized organization pass responsibilities and accountability down from one level of management to a lower level or to an employee. This is called delegation ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Delegation, decentralized organization, span of control, chain of command, centralized organization, Authority in the Decentralized Organization, Authority in the centralized Organization, centralized organization, approaches to authority,
Views: 73 Forever Suspicious
MISTAKE FOUND! in new Rs 2000 Note & Quick test to find fake note
 
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Started from today (11-Nov-2016) the new currency notes for Rs 2000 and Rs are available. Here is a short video to check if the note you have for Rs 2000 INR is fake or real. After indian PM Narendra modi declared this news its getting viral. I guess you have already been to the never ending lines for these magenta bills. Take the first look of Rs 2000 currency note and check out the typing mistake in that. in hindi its written as "Don hazaar rupye" which should be "do hazaar rupye"
Views: 244 Forever Suspicious
#41 – Effect of Centralization, Specialization and Structure | Organizational Design and Behavior
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #41 – Effect of Centralization, Specialization and Structure of Organisation on Employee Performance | Organizational Design and Behaviour An organization is a group of people who work together to achieve a common goal. There are many different types of organizations, but every organization has one thing in common. Every organization has a structure, which defines the roles and clarifies the relationships between members of the organization. The founders of an organization consider all the elements of organizational structure and attempt to select the structure which makes their organization as efficient as possible. Consideration should also be given to how the individual structural elements affect the performance and behaviour of organizational members. Of the six elements of structural design, two have been proven to consistently impact organizational members: work specialization and centralization. Work specialization is how tasks are subdivided into separate jobs within an organization. A high level of specialization makes an organization more efficient but can also lead to boredom by organizational members who tire of doing the same repetitive task day in and day out. Centralization determines 'Where does the decision-making authority lie?' in an organization. A highly centralized organization allows decision making only from top management, while an organization with low centralization includes input from lower level personnel into the decision making process. The participative decision-making process, which is a key part of a low level of centralization, is positively related to job satisfaction. Although these two elements of organizational structure have been proven to consistently impact the performance and behaviour of organizational members, it is important to understand that this is not true for everyone. People are different, and while the majority of workers prefer low specialization and centralization, it is not true for everyone. So, when considering the impact that these elements of organizational structure have on members of organizations, it is important not to generalize ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Centralization, Work specialization, organisational Structure, Organizational Design, Organizational Behaviour, mechanistic and organic structures, Organizational change, How Structure Influences Organizational Members, Employee Performance, elements of organizational structure, effects of structure on employee performance and behaviour
Views: 70 Forever Suspicious
#44 – Groupthink Explained | Did you go along with majority even though you did not agree?
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #44 – Groupthink Explained | Did you go along with majority even though you did not agree with the decision? Groupthink occurs when a group makes faulty or ineffective decisions for the sake of reaching a consensus. Groups affected by groupthink will disregard realistic alternatives and typically choose more illogical approaches in an effort to maintain harmony within the group. As a result, the outcomes of decisions shaped by groupthink have a low probability of success. However, there are some preventative measures that can be taken to reduce the chances of groupthink. Perhaps one of the most well-known examples of groupthink can be found in the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster. Remaining on schedule for the launch took priority that day over safety. Group members fell victim to several circumstances that contributed to groupthink, which led to the decision to launch the Challenger despite knowing the potential for O-ring failure in extreme cold temperatures. This faulty decision making on the eve of the Challenger launch would soon prove to be a fatal mistake. Just moments after the Challenger launched, the O-ring failed and the Challenger exploded, causing seven crew members to lose their lives. This example serves as a reminder to all groups of the disastrous outcomes that result from groupthink, and the need to make an effort to take preventative measures to decrease it. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: Groupthink, Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster, Groupthink Explained, Have I Experienced Groupthink?, what is groupthink, group think, group thinking, groupthinking,
Views: 43 Forever Suspicious
Creating Freelancing Account - Profile Setup | Make money online #3
 
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#2 Previous Video: https://youtu.be/wkHWYz4mWdU Series: How to make money online #3 - Creating freelancer Account - Profile Setup Once you have created your accounts in the websites the next step is to set up a decent profile in a way that it impresses your employer or the client in just one look. This video is the basic/ Beginners version and it should help you create your profile for the first time online when you are about to start your freelancing career, you can improve more of your profile at later stages since they can be edited later. In this video, I will point out some common mistakes people make while they make their online profile and altogether after this you will be all set to start freelancing. (If you have any questions post them in comment) So, if you are ready to become a freelancer go ahead and subscribe to my channel and watch the whole series and be your own boss to work without any restriction and earn from home! Authour: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious
Views: 7145 Forever Suspicious
#59 – Fiedler's Contingency Theory | A Leader's Situational Control
 
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Business 101: Principles of Management #59 – Fiedler's Contingency Theory | A Leader's Situational Control Fiedler's contingency theory argues that there is no one leadership style. There are situation-contingent factors that determine for a particular situation. These factors are leadership style and situational favourableness. Leadership style is determined by rating a leader's least preferred co-worker on the least preferred co-worker (LPC) scale. A leader is asked to rate someone he or she least liked working with (presently or in the past) on a scale of 1-8 in the following areas: - Unfriendly/friendly - Uncooperative/cooperative - Hostile/supportive - Guarded/open Situation favourableness occurs when the three dimensions - leader-member relations, task structure, and leader position power - are high. There are three dimensions of situation favourableness. Leader-member relations refers to the degree of trust, respect, and confidence that exists between the leader and the workers. Task structure refers to the degree to which tasks are clearly explained and structured for workers. Leader position power refers to the degree to which the leader possesses inherent power in his or her position. When all three dimensions are high, a leader will be more effective. However, leaders who ranked a low LPC are effective in both favourable and unfavourable situations. Leaders who ranked a high LPC are generally effective only in favourable situations. ----------------------------------------------------------------- Presented by: Soumy Nayak | Forever Suspicious Credits: Study.com ----------------------------------------------------------------- Tags: leadership, Leadership in Organizations, A Leader's Role, leader in organisation, Fiedler's contingency theory, types of leadership, LPC, Situation favorableness, Situation favourableness, situation-contingent, favourable situations, Power, manager power, how management works, personal power
Views: 43 Forever Suspicious
How to connect two PC - Remote Desktop Connection
 
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Remote desktop Connection allows a user to log into another computer on the same network and use its resources. We will see how you can share the screen or even control another compter PC from your computer. We are going to use the inbuilt Desktop app for Remote Connection from Microsoft windows and Its not required to download anything or coding of anykind
Views: 147 Forever Suspicious

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